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GMO companies thrive in lack of regulation

In the face of no international standards on GMO produce - and ambivalence about whether pros outweigh cons for GMO agriculture - companies are able to muscle GMO agricultural practices throughout Latin America.

FORO writes,

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Sources:

FORO Nacional/Internacional, May 2010, page 4: http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_May2010.pdf#page=4

See: Clive James, 2009 in: http://isaaa.org/resources/publications/briefs/41/executivesummary/pdf/Brief%2041%20-%20Executive%20Summary%20-%20Spanish.pdf

FAO and the Acquisition for Agri-Biotech Aplications (ISAAA) point out the need to feed 9,200 million people in 2050, this require to double the food production in less than 50 years. See: http://isaaa.org/resources/publications/briefs/41/executivesummary/pdf/Brief%2041%20-%20Executive%20Summary%20-%20Spanish.pdf

http://transgenicos.ecoportal.net/

http://www.greenpeace.org/raw/content/espana/reports/que-sabes-de-los-transgenicos-2.pdf

http://www.codexalimentarius.net/web/index_es.jsp

http://www.cbd.int/doc/legal/cartagena-protocol-es.pdf

Venezuela and Brazil have some regulation about GM. See: http://www.semillas.org.co/sitio.shtml?apc=h1-1--&x=20156447

After the earthquake in Haiti, the Company Montsanto tried to donate 475 tons of GM seeds to Haiti, but Haitian authorities did not accept them. See: http://alainet.org/active/38266.

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Transgenic-free zones protect farmers against GMO agricultural practices

FORO Nacional Internacional writes,

"Some civil society networks and environmental organizations are informing citizens about the possible risks and impacts of GM agriculture, and one of the results has been to create transgenic-free zones, where GMOs are not allowed. Genetically Modified Organisms are becoming increasingly prominent in South America, yet they continue to face strong resistance.

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Sources:

FORO Nacional/Internacional, May 2010, page 4: http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_May2010.pdf#page=4

Clive James, 2009 in: http://isaaa.org/resources/publications/briefs/41/executivesummary/pdf/Brief%2041%20-%20Executive%20Summary%20-%20Spanish.pdf

FAO and the Acquisition for Agri-Biotech Aplications (ISAAA) point out the need to feed 9,200 million people in 2050, this require to double the food production in less than 50 years. See: http://isaaa.org/resources/publications/briefs/41/executivesummary/pdf/Brief%2041%20-%20Executive%20Summary%20-%20Spanish.pdf

http://transgenicos.ecoportal.net/

http://www.greenpeace.org/raw/content/espana/reports/que-sabes-de-los-transgenicos-2.pdf

http://www.codexalimentarius.net/web/index_es.jsp and http://www.cbd.int/doc/legal/cartagena-protocol-es.pdf

Venezuela and Brazil have some regulation about GM. See: http://www.semillas.org.co/sitio.shtml?apc=h1-1--&x=20156447

After the earthquake in Haiti, the Company Montsanto tried to donate 475 tons of GM seeds to Haiti, but Haitian authorities did not accept them. See: http://alainet.org/active/38266.

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Organic Rice Farming in Thailand as a Method to Escape Debt Entrapment

IFTF writes that in the face of an intensifying debt cycle, many rice farmers are moving toward organic agriculture away from the industrial methods of rice production that depend on hybrid seeds, fertilizer, agricultural machinery, and other high production costs. These high production costs often leave razor thin margins for farmers, compelling them to borrow for the next season, creating a debt cycle that squeezes farmers even while rice production in Thailand as a whole improves.

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Sources:

Strategic Foresight Group, Dec 2010, page 18:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SFG_Dec2010.pdf#page=18

‘The real life of Thai rice farmers who produce to feed the world.’ Thailandreform.net. 23 August, 2010: http://www.thailandreform.net/data/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=77:thereal-
life-of-thai-rice-farmers-who-produce-to-feed-the-world&catid=95:article&Itemid=9
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