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Formal sector working to help the informal sector

The informal shipwrecking industry in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan truly epitomizes modern day labor exploitation as mentioned in this signal. In India we are seeing the formal dock workers teaming up with their neighboring shipbreakers in order to help them better their labor conditions.

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International labor laws may become more lax

“As tattered laborers wait beachside in a secluded Mumbai port, an aging ship making its twilight voyage runs aground, settling its hull into the sand before flopping, listlessly, on its thick steel side . The shipbreakers rush to the death scene of the expired vessel and, without hesitation, begin the long, laborious process of dismantling the scrapped ship by hand. Wading through toxins, pulling apart asbestos-laden pieces and inhaling oil, gas and other hazardous fumes earns them a meager wage for the day.

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Shadow economies growing in the wake of the financial crisis

The South Africa Node writes,

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Sources:

South Africa Node Aug 2010, pg. 3
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SA-Node_Aug2010.pdf#page=3

www.economist.com/node/16784402?story_id=16784402&fsrc=rss

www.economics-ejournal.org/economics/journalarticles/2007-9

http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/issues/issues30/index.htm

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Trade Liberalization Does Not Always Lead to Gender Equality

Proponents of trade liberalization and economic globalization have often claimed such policies lead to increased equality for women. Evidence in Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has been mixed so far. Millennium Project South Africa Node writes the following:

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Sources:

Millennium Project South Africa Node March 2010, pages 8
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SA-Node_Mar2010#page=9

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Non-formal learning centers educate urban slum children

In Bangladesh, NGO-run learning centers, operating outside the formal school system, find ways to education the growing urban slum children population that the formal system has not reached.

The Strategic Foresight Group writes,

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Average: 3 (5 votes)
 

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Bangladesh faces the permanence of slums

"Every year, around 300,000-400,000 new migrants flock into Dhaka, the bulk of which come from rural, underprivileged backgrounds and are seeking employment opportunities in the city's fast-growing manufacturing and service sectors. However, the reality they face upon arrival is grim--unable to afford decent housing, they are forced to move into large, illegal settlements.

2.34
Average: 2.3 (3 votes)
 

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Latin America Faces Growing Challenges for Pension System

"While for the last 25 years there has been decreasing social security coverage, Latin America's population over 65 is growing and will triple from 6.3% in 2005 to 18.5% in 2050. Also, labor markets continue to be highly informal, while independent and short-term employment have been increasing, which further complicates coverage and affiliation to retirement schemes. South American pension systems have been diverse in terms of coverage and quality, yet in no case have they incorporated all workers (see figure).

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Average: 3 (1 vote)
 

Sources:

FORO Nacional International, August 2010, pg. 2
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_Aug2010.pdf#page=2

For an in depth look at labor issues see William Greider's One World Ready or Not: the manic logic of global capitalism
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