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Microfinance believed to be connected to poverty alleviation in India and Bangladesh

"Nearly 45 million people saw their incomes rise above US$1 .25 (INR 56) per day in the two decades ending 2010. A report based on a survey of more than 15,000 Indian households by the India Development Foundation finds that: ‘There is significant correlation in both India and Bangladesh between the presence of microfinance and the movement out of poverty in the rural areas of both the countries, especially in the early years.’”

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Bangladesh needs consistent power and gas supply to maintain growth

“The ongoing shortage of power and gas supply will be the main obstacle to Bangladesh’s economic growth, as forecasted by the Bangladesh Bank (BB). The government’s ability to eliminate energy shortages and to add capacity will have significant effects on short- and medium-term growth.”

Implications from IFTF:

We often focus development efforts on new technologies and innovations, this signal however points out something very important. Without basic infrastructures growth will only reach a certain level, until basic infrastructures are in place.

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India finds success in ‘affordable private schools’

“Achieving universal primary education is listed as goal two in the Millennium Development Goals. Yet, the debate on who should deliver this service is still open. Education is seen widely among development professionals as deliverable by the State. Most developing countries, and particularly India, Bangladesh and Pakistan, have a public education system in place to provide education to the poor, but by most accounts, this system has not lived up to expectations.

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Sources:

Intellecap October 2009, pages 4-6
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_Oct2009.pdf#pg=4

- Baird, Ross. Private Schools for the Poor. Grey Matters Capital, 2009. Tooley, James and Pauline Dixon. Private Schools for the Poor – A Case Study from India, CfBT Research and Development, 2003.

 Maleka Khatoon School: http://school4poor.com/docs_pdf/the_story.pdf

- Mati School: http://www.betterplace.org/projects/903-mati-school-education-for-extremely-poorchildren

 Private schools in Pakistan: http://www.yespakistan.com/education/private_schools.asp

 Clive Crook, The Ten-cent Solution, The Atlantic, http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200703/crook-schools

 Richard Garner, Professor given $100m to save world's schools, The Independent,
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/professor-given-100m-to-saveworlds-schools-436574.html

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Solar Irrigation Technology in Bangladesh

“In Bangladesh, the introduction of solar water pumps, which are manufactured using locally available technologies, will not only help poor and marginal farmers increase their yield but also bring down their agricultural production costs substantially in the next 20 years.

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Bangladesh utilizing IT to aid healthcare system

The digitizing of the healthcare system is still a long way off for many developing nations. Bangladesh on the other hand is moving full speed ahead with innovative uses and investments for ehealth. Below are some examples from SFG.

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Bangladesh is paying people for further training

In an attempt to combat unemployment, Bangladesh launched a training program that will pay people with high school educations to get training in particular fields, and then provide them with a 2 year employment contract at 80USD a month.

2.01
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Formal sector working to help the informal sector

The informal shipwrecking industry in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan truly epitomizes modern day labor exploitation as mentioned in this signal. In India we are seeing the formal dock workers teaming up with their neighboring shipbreakers in order to help them better their labor conditions.

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International labor laws may become more lax

“As tattered laborers wait beachside in a secluded Mumbai port, an aging ship making its twilight voyage runs aground, settling its hull into the sand before flopping, listlessly, on its thick steel side . The shipbreakers rush to the death scene of the expired vessel and, without hesitation, begin the long, laborious process of dismantling the scrapped ship by hand. Wading through toxins, pulling apart asbestos-laden pieces and inhaling oil, gas and other hazardous fumes earns them a meager wage for the day.

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Solar Energy investments in Bangladesh could supplement, replace electricity grid

The major gaps in Bangladesh's energy grid and the growing energy crisis could be met by distributed solar energy systems. These have enabled electrification in many villages, where the grid will not realistically extend for another 30 years, and they can address issues of both access and supply. Bangladesh has made some moves to support the industry, but more are needed if solar energy will be a major part of an energy solution.

Intellecap writes,

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