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Government plans satellite mapping to prevent new slums

“The Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation in India plans to introduce satellite mapping to discover new slum settlements and prevent their illegal spread. The geographical information system (GIS) will help it analyze slum communities, providing them basic amenities, and relocate them to other suitable areas. This is a step forward towards the target of a slum-free free India in the next five years. The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) will collaborate on the project.

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Sources:

Intellecap March 2010, pages 5-6
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_Mar2010.pdf#pg=5

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Solar Energy Has Compounding Benefits for the Poor in India

Bangalore-based Selco has brought solar electricity to slums, providing value beyond what appliances provide in themselves:

"Though the slum-dwellers were employed and had earned income, their illegal settlement was not allowed to access “the grid” cables that crisscrossed overhead . Instead, families spent INR45 (US$1) per liter on kerosene—a financially unsustainable solution that could only be used for bare necessities such as cooking."

Selco claims that "solar energy empowers the urban poor to spend an additional couple of hours after dark in income generating activities such as

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Shackdweller's movement in KwaZulu Natal voices needs of slum community; faces pressure from government

The SA node writes that:

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Education in Bangladeshi slums gets pro-poor

Providing eduction for children who, by necessity, need to work has always been a challenge. Bangladesh seems to have found part of the answer.

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Sources:

Strategic Foresight Group, July 2010, pg. 4
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SFG_July2010.pdf#page=4

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Media sharing platform gives voice to slum dwellers in Africa

An organization leverages the Ushahidi platform to aggregate and visualize local citizen-driven information in one of Africa's largest slums. The Society for International Development highlights that the Kibera Slum Community is a media sharing platform for locals, social services providers and development partners.

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Sources:


The Society for International Development, May 2010, page 4: http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SIF_May2010.pdf#page=4

Voice of Kibera: http://voiceofkibera.org/page/index/1

Map Kibera: http://mapkibera.org/

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Non-formal learning centers educate urban slum children

In Bangladesh, NGO-run learning centers, operating outside the formal school system, find ways to education the growing urban slum children population that the formal system has not reached.

The Strategic Foresight Group writes,

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Indian slums to charge fee for safe drinking water

India, like many countries, is struggling in the effort to provide clean drinking water for all its citizens. In a move to gain more funding to do this, "they hope to fund an effort to improve rural water supply by adding a one Rupee tax onto bottle mineral water. Nearly 8 billion bottles of mineral water are consumed in the state in one year. The additional tax would raise INR8bn (US$170m)."

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Bangladesh faces the permanence of slums

"Every year, around 300,000-400,000 new migrants flock into Dhaka, the bulk of which come from rural, underprivileged backgrounds and are seeking employment opportunities in the city's fast-growing manufacturing and service sectors. However, the reality they face upon arrival is grim--unable to afford decent housing, they are forced to move into large, illegal settlements.

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Sanitation Improvements and Obstacles in Indian Slums

Sanitation is a major national problem in India, requiring urgent action, especially given the rapid rate of urbanization expected in the coming decade:

"India’s urban sanitation sector is presently inadequate and the situation could worsen in the coming decades unless acted upon immediately.
In 2008, around 423 cities in India did not meet the sanitation standards.

2.604
Average: 2.6 (5 votes)
 

Sources:

Strategic Foresight Group, Asian Horizons, Issue No: 8, October 2010. Page 2.

http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SFG_Oct2010.pdf#page=2

Saikat. ‘Urban Sanitation Remains Poor Even As India Develops Into a Thriving Economy’.
About My Planet. 26 June 2010. <http://www.aboutmyplanet.com/environment/urban-sanitation-
remains-poor-even-as-india-develops-into-a-thriving-economy/>

Singh, Mahendra Kumar. ‘Nearly 49,000 slums in India: NSSO’. Times of India. 27 May 2010.
<http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Nearly-49000-slums-in-India-
NSSO/articleshow/5978216.cms>

‘Rank of Cities of Sanitation 2009-2010: National Urban Sanitation Policy’.
<http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/rank_cities_0910.pdf>

Kapur, Depinder S. ‘What is ailing sanitation sector in India?’ 19 November 2007.
<http://www.wsscc.org/fileadmin/files/pdf/For_country_pages/What_is_ailing_poor_sanitation_c
overage_in_India.pdf>

‘A Guide to Decisionmaking: Technology Options for Urban Sanitation in India’ Water and
Sanitation Programme, Government of India. September 2008. <http://www.wsp.org/UserFiles/file/Urban_Sanitation.pdf>

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Delay of National Urban Health Mission a major setback for urban poor

In early 2010, the Indian government announced the delay of a major initiative to provide affordable health services for the urban poor, dealing a huge blow to the slum dwellers without social safety nets and stuck with a strained and fraying healthcare system.

Intellecap writes,

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