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Mobile Phones Catch Epidemics Earlier in South Asia

The Real‐time Biosurveillance Program (RTBP) was launched in India
and Sri Lanka by by LRNEasia, the Indian Institute of Technology —Madras (IITM), Carnegie Mellon University's Auton Lab, the University of Alberta and the International Development Research Center (IDRC), "to test the potential of using mobile phones in health data collection.

3
Average: 3 (1 vote)
 

Sources:

Intellecap May 2011 page 1, 2, 3:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_May2011.pdf#page=1

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Massive Urban Renewal underway for Poor in India

"In an effort to deal with rising urbanization and urban poverty within the country, the Indian government has recently bolstered efforts to provide low-cost urban housing."

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Sources:

Strategic Foresight Group, Asian Horizons, Issue No: 6, August 2010. Page 4.

http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SFG_Aug2010.pdf#page=4

• ‘World Urbanization Prospects: The 2007 Revision Population Database’.
<http://esa.un.org/unup/>

• ‘National Urban Housing and Habitat Policy 2007’. Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty
Alleviation, Government of India. < http://mhupa.gov.in/policies/duepa/HousingPolicy2007.pdf> • ‘India: Promoting Inclusive Urban Development in Indian Cities’. Asian Development Bank.
October 2008. <http://www.adb.org/Documents/TARs/IND/41609-IND-TAR.pdf>

• ‘Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation: New Initiatives’. India Current Affairs. 31 December
2009. <http://indiacurrentaffairs.org/housing-and-urban-poverty-alleviation-new-initiatives/>

• ‘India's urban poor need 40 mn houses, 500 health centres: ASSOCHAM report’. InfoChange India. 3 January 2008. <http://infochangeindia.org/200801236839/Urban-India/News/India-s-
urban-poor-need-40-mn-houses-500-health-centres-ASSOCHAM-report.html>

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Mid-day Meal Scheme fights Food Inflation & Urban Malnutrition in India

"Between 1999 and 2005, urban malnutrition in adults as well as children remained high in India, with very little change. At present, over 70% of people in urban areas consume fewer calories than the National Sample Survey Organization’s calorie norm, compared to 61% in rural areas."

"...numbers of the poor in urban areas will continue to increase over the next decade. In 2030, an estimated 91 million people will be poor in urban areas."

1.68
Average: 1.7 (3 votes)
 

Sources:

Strategic Foresight Group, Asian Horizons, Issue No: 6, August 2010. Page 2.

http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SFG_Aug2010.pdf#page=2

• Mirza, Maheen. ‘Urban Poverty and Malnutrition Increase in MP’. InfoChange India. March
2010. <http://infochangeindia.org/Agriculture/Urban-poverty-and-the-food-crisis/Urban-poverty-
and-malnutrition-increase-in-MP .html> • ‘National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3) 2005–06: India Volume I’. International Institute for
Population Sciences (IIPS) and Macro International. September 2007.
<http://www.nfhsindia.org/NFHS-3%20Data/VOL-1/India_volume_I_corrected_17oct08.pdf> • ‘National Family Health Survey (NFHS-2), 1998–99: India’. International Institute for Population Sciences (IIPS) and ORC Macro. October 2000.
<http://www.nfhsindia.org/pnfhs2.html> • ‘Antyodaya Anna Yojana’. Department of Food and Public Distribution, Government of India.
<http://fcamin.nic.in/dfpd_html/aay.htm> • Vashishtha, MV Vipin. ‘Rising Urbanization of Poverty-A Blot on the Shining Armor: India
Urban Poverty Report 2009’. Indian Pediatrics. 17 October 2009.
<http://medind.nic.in/ibv/t09/i10/ibvt09i10p875.pdf> • ‘India: Urban Poverty Report 2009: Factsheet’. United Nations Development Programme.
<http://data.undp.org.in/poverty_reduction/Factsheet_IUPR_09a.pdf>

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Developing 8 Countries (D-8) Business Forum meets

The D-8 group of "developing" countries with large Muslim populations is an important network of South-South solidarity and trade, and its Business Forum convened in July 2010 and announced a new series of trade missions. The D-8 is made up of Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Turkey.

1.515
Average: 1.5 (2 votes)
 

Sources:

Center for Democracy and Development, July 2010 pg. 10:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/CDD_July2010.pdf#page=10

Http://www.apanews.net/spip.php?arti cle128131

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Financial inflows from developing countries more stable than developed countries

“South African FDI, along with flows from transnational corporations (TNCs) in other developing countries, such as China and India, had proved less volatile during the recent economic crisis than had been the case with flows from developed economy TNCs, which slumped markedly… [as such] emerging country investors like China and South Africa are expected to be more resilient than traditional ones, providing a potential buffer against further developed world economic stagnation and/or crises.”

Implications from Institute for the Future:

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Average: 3 (1 vote)
 

Sources:

South Africa Node July 2010, pg. 2
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SA-Node_July2010.pdf#page=2

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China is not the biggest Foreign Direct Investor in Africa, South Africa is.

"According to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development’s (Unctad) latest World Investment Report (WIR) South Africa was the largest ‘developing country’ foreign direct investor (FDI) in Africa between 2006 and 2008, with South African companies having invested an average of US$2,61-billion a year over the period, which was higher than FDI flows from China, whose companies invested an average of US$2,53-billion a year on the continent during the same period.

1.02
Average: 1 (2 votes)
 

Sources:

South Africa Node July 2010, pg. 2
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SA-Node_July2010.pdf#page=2

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People Migrating From Farther to Live in Mumbai

Within Mahashtra—the western Indian state in which Mumbai is the capital—more than 74 percent of the migration is from rural to urban areas. Sixty percent of all migration within the state is into Mumbai from four nearby districts, Ratnagiri, Satara, Pune and Raigad. However, according to Strategic Foresight Group Asian Horizons, this trend is changing rapidly.
“The last census in 2001 revealed that the migration from districts farther away from the city, i.e. the other parts of Maharashtra, such as Latur, Nanded, Solapur, Parbhani, Jalna, Osmanabad and Beed is on the increase.”

2.01
Average: 2 (1 vote)
 

Sources:

Strategic Foresight Group Asian Horizons March 2010, page 3
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SFG_Mar2010.pdf#page=3

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Climate change is driving rural-to-urban migration in Bangladesh

Rural-to-urban migration in Bangladesh has traditionally been in response to the pull of better job opportunities, but it is now being pushed by conditions resulting from climate change. Yields for agricultural produce are falling; there were 14 reported food shortages from 1998 to 2008. The increased rate of rural-to-urban migration has resulted in lower rural poverty rates, but it is compounding urban poverty and taking a toll on urban infrastructure, with santitation being the hardest hit.

3
Average: 3 (2 votes)
 

Sources:

Searchlight South Asia, March 2010, page 3
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_Mar2010.pdf

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Citizen advocacy organizations are bringing political awareness and self-determination to the lower classes in India.

A burgeoning citizen movement in India is bringing a political voice to those who've traditionally been more on the sidelines in India's democracy. These programs are helping to institute greater citizen particpation in governance, leadership, and urban reform. Recent changes in the way money is distributed by the Indian government should translate to more self-determination at the local level, sidestepping intervening state bureaucracies. Some of these funds will be tied to greater accounability and reforms in how local governments do business.

2.01
Average: 2 (1 vote)
 

Sources:

Searchlight South Asia, March 2010, page 1
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_Mar2010.pdf

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A New Way of Measuring Poverty in India

According to Strategic Foresight Group Asian Horizons (SFGAH), a report given to the Planning Commission of India in December 2009 "recommended a new method, where the present national urban poverty line is taken as the basis for estimating every other poverty line in the country. According to experts, the new poverty line would factor in not just food requirements, but also those of education and healthcare that are important basic needs. Therefore, using this method in 2004-05 the percentage of poor was estimated as 41.8% in rural areas and 25.7% in urban areas.

1.02
Average: 1 (2 votes)
 

Sources:

Strategic Foresight Group Asian Horizons March 2010, page 2
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/SFG_Mar2010#page=2
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