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Angola passes law to spur biofuel production

Angola recently passed a law aimed at promoting domestic biofuel production. The South Africa Notes writes: “According to the Oil Minister, Botelho de Vasconcelos, the law will address Angola’s national energy needs and ‘preserve the environment given the diversification of the economy’ [sic]. ‘Bio-fuel production will also create jobs and build a renewable energy source and will allow regional integration and promote return of populations to rural areas’.

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Shackdweller's movement in KwaZulu Natal voices needs of slum community; faces pressure from government

The SA node writes that:

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Bangladesh faces the permanence of slums

"Every year, around 300,000-400,000 new migrants flock into Dhaka, the bulk of which come from rural, underprivileged backgrounds and are seeking employment opportunities in the city's fast-growing manufacturing and service sectors. However, the reality they face upon arrival is grim--unable to afford decent housing, they are forced to move into large, illegal settlements.

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Why are poverty wages sometimes enough?

Although it may be hard for people in the global north or in the middle and upper class strata of the global south to understand why anyone would choose to work under terrible conditions for a mere 24USD a month (see http://rfsearchlight.clearsignals.org/node/246), as we will see, something is still better than nothing.

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Bangladesh fighting wage arbitrage

"The 29th of July 2010 was an important day for roughly 3.5 million Bangladeshis. The Bangladesh Wage Board, after a series of protests from workers in the growing garment sector, agreed to double the minimum wage. Workers who were earning a monthly TK1,662.50(US$24) will now be earning TK3,000 a month.

"The TK3,000 promise is still far from the TK5,000 per month they've demanded, and is only a one-time increase rather than an annual reassessment... It seems violence in the city has actually increased, with workers smashing cars and blocking roads in response to the announcement.

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Crime in Rapidly Growing Inner Cities on the Rise in Latin America

Urbanization at a rate beyond the absorption capacity of already existing cities has for a long time been known as a major issue in developing countries, in part because it is connected with increased rates of crime. While "crime in urban areas in South America reached alarming levels during the 1980s ... the situation has radically changed in the 2000s: crime is consolidating as an urban phenomenon ... in regional cities."

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Sources:

FORO Nacional International, August 2010, pg. 3:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_Aug2010.pdf#page=3

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Latin America Faces Growing Challenges for Pension System

"While for the last 25 years there has been decreasing social security coverage, Latin America's population over 65 is growing and will triple from 6.3% in 2005 to 18.5% in 2050. Also, labor markets continue to be highly informal, while independent and short-term employment have been increasing, which further complicates coverage and affiliation to retirement schemes. South American pension systems have been diverse in terms of coverage and quality, yet in no case have they incorporated all workers (see figure).

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Sources:

FORO Nacional International, August 2010, pg. 2
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_Aug2010.pdf#page=2

For an in depth look at labor issues see William Greider's One World Ready or Not: the manic logic of global capitalism
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