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Singapore’s holistic water management system helps show path to sustainable urban water

Over the past four decades, Singapore leveraged land use controls, water recycling technology, education campaigns, and catchment systems to build a system uniquely tailored to Singapore and incredibly resilient. The wide use of tools and constant adaptation to local constraints is a compelling recipe for other cities.

NISTPASS writes,

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Sources:

NISTPASS Science and Technology Scanning: Asia Pacific, Dec 2010, pg 7-8:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/NISTPASS_Dec2010.pdf#page=7

Singapore's experiences in sustainable water management: http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90001/90781/6247473.html

Singapore guidelines for sustainable water management in the city: http://www.nanyang100.com/singapore/7055.html

Singapore Looks To Ensure Water Sustainability Into The Future: http://www.thegovmonitor.com/world_news/asia/singapore-looks-to-ensure-water-sustainability-into-the-future-34539.html

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Urban agriculture as mitigation measure for food security, inflation, nutrition challenges in cities

The From Farm to Table project, facilitating sustainable urban farming systems around the world, targets key constraints to urban agriculture. The result is a set of strategies for making urban agriculture a bigger part of the national agenda, nutrition solutions, and urban economies. Among the key barriers are recognition and protection by governments, lack of market knowledge, lack of information access, and pollution.

Intellecap writes,

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Indian slums to charge fee for safe drinking water

India, like many countries, is struggling in the effort to provide clean drinking water for all its citizens. In a move to gain more funding to do this, "they hope to fund an effort to improve rural water supply by adding a one Rupee tax onto bottle mineral water. Nearly 8 billion bottles of mineral water are consumed in the state in one year. The additional tax would raise INR8bn (US$170m)."

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How to deal with increasing public health concerns in India

India is struggling to keep up with public health needs in the face of increased urbanization and global climate change issues. "The spread of disease and infection during the monsoon [season] is not new. But, medical workers in Indian cities are becoming increasingly wary of it as cities grow and flooding due to inadequate drainage systems increases the frequency of stagnant water. Density of urban areas, combined with poor infrastructure management and poor hygiene, create nests of infection, which could lead, in time, to a public health disaster.

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Sources:

Searchlight South Asia by Intellecap, pg. 4 - 5:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/Intellecap_Aug2010.pdf#page=4

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Bangladesh faces the permanence of slums

"Every year, around 300,000-400,000 new migrants flock into Dhaka, the bulk of which come from rural, underprivileged backgrounds and are seeking employment opportunities in the city's fast-growing manufacturing and service sectors. However, the reality they face upon arrival is grim--unable to afford decent housing, they are forced to move into large, illegal settlements.

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Why are poverty wages sometimes enough?

Although it may be hard for people in the global north or in the middle and upper class strata of the global south to understand why anyone would choose to work under terrible conditions for a mere 24USD a month (see http://rfsearchlight.clearsignals.org/node/246), as we will see, something is still better than nothing.

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Crime in Rapidly Growing Inner Cities on the Rise in Latin America

Urbanization at a rate beyond the absorption capacity of already existing cities has for a long time been known as a major issue in developing countries, in part because it is connected with increased rates of crime. While "crime in urban areas in South America reached alarming levels during the 1980s ... the situation has radically changed in the 2000s: crime is consolidating as an urban phenomenon ... in regional cities."

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Sources:

FORO Nacional International, August 2010, pg. 3:
http://newsletters.clearsignals.org/FORO_Aug2010.pdf#page=3

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China's Path Towards Low Carbon Development

China's rapid development has been a cause for concern for environmentalists. As China's more then 1.3 billion people find owning refrigerators, TVs, and other electronic devices part of the new norm, their use of electricity sky rockets. The big development question is how to allow poorer communities the advantages of wealthier communities without adding to climate change problems.

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